On a Quantum of The Cosmos, As an Evolving Life...

   "I don't like it, and I'm sorry I ever had anything to do with it." -Erwin Schrodinger

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  Incredible Closeup of Horsehead Nebula by Aldo Mottino

    Incredible Closeup of Horsehead Nebula by Aldo Mottino

    (Source: afro-dominicano, via scinerds)

    — 23 hours ago with 847 notes
    "Human action is the only element in primitive experience that exhibits any connectedness: the only system of interrelated doings that people have any grasp of is what goes on in their society. Hence, making sense of the world at large must consist in conceiving it in social terms: purposes, motives, will, good, evil, love, hate, and other emotions. Primitive worldviews must be teleological; agency must be personal, volition must be the only causation recognized.”

Matson, Wallace (2011-11-11). Grand Theories and Everyday Beliefs: Science, Philosophy, and their Histories.

    "Human action is the only element in primitive experience that exhibits any connectedness: the only system of interrelated doings that people have any grasp of is what goes on in their society. Hence, making sense of the world at large must consist in conceiving it in social terms: purposes, motives, will, good, evil, love, hate, and other emotions. Primitive worldviews must be teleological; agency must be personal, volition must be the only causation recognized.”

    Matson, Wallace (2011-11-11). Grand Theories and Everyday Beliefs: Science, Philosophy, and their Histories.

    (Source: mdm-arabi)

    — 2 days ago with 2 notes
    #Philosophy  #Religion  #Beliefs  #theism  #Mythology  #Wallace Matson 

    jtotheizzoe:

    Forty-five years ago today, two human beings first set foot on the moon. On July 20, 1969, the lunar module of Apollo 11 touched down in the Sea of Tranquility, and forever changed how we view our place in the universe. When I think about the fact that four and a half decades ago, at the very moment I am writing this, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin were walking on the freakin’ moon, I am humbled and inspired.

    I’ve combined some of my favorite photos from Apollo 11 with some of the actual words spoken by Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin, and Michael Collins.

    If you’d like to relive the historic mission moment by moment, word by word, and photo by photo, head over to SpaceLog

    (via science-in-a-jar)

    — 2 days ago with 2555 notes
    academicatheism:

Evolution of life’s operating system revealed in detail
The evolution of the ribosome, a large molecular structure found in the cells of all species, has been revealed in unprecedented detail in a new study.
Around 4 billion years ago, the first molecules of life came together on the early Earth and formed precursors of modern proteins and RNA. Scientists studying the origin of life have been searching for clues about how these reactions happened. Some of those clues have been found in the ribosome.
Continue Reading

    academicatheism:

    Evolution of life’s operating system revealed in detail

    The evolution of the ribosome, a large molecular structure found in the cells of all species, has been revealed in unprecedented detail in a new study.

    Around 4 billion years ago, the first molecules of life came together on the early Earth and formed precursors of modern proteins and RNA. Scientists studying the origin of life have been searching for clues about how these reactions happened. Some of those clues have been found in the ribosome.

    Continue Reading

    — 2 weeks ago with 59 notes
    thenewenlightenmentage:

Comet Pan-STARRS Marches Across the Sky
NASA’s NEOWISE mission captured a series of pictures of comet C/2012 K1 — also known as comet Pan-STARRS — as it swept across our skies in May 2014.
The comet is named after the astronomical survey project called the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System in Hawaii, which discovered the icy visitor in May 2012.
Comet Pan-STARRS hails from the outer fringes of our solar system, from a vast and distant reservoir of comets called the Oort cloud.
Continue Reading

    thenewenlightenmentage:

    Comet Pan-STARRS Marches Across the Sky

    NASA’s NEOWISE mission captured a series of pictures of comet C/2012 K1 — also known as comet Pan-STARRS — as it swept across our skies in May 2014.

    The comet is named after the astronomical survey project called the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System in Hawaii, which discovered the icy visitor in May 2012.

    Comet Pan-STARRS hails from the outer fringes of our solar system, from a vast and distant reservoir of comets called the Oort cloud.

    Continue Reading

    — 2 weeks ago with 30 notes
    spacettf:

Clouds and Sunglint over Indian Ocean by NASA on The Commons on Flickr.Tramite Flickr:
Clouds and sunglint as seen during the STS-96 mission from the Space Shuttle Discovery. 
Image # : STS096-705-066 

    spacettf:

    Clouds and Sunglint over Indian Ocean by NASA on The Commons on Flickr.

    Tramite Flickr:
    Clouds and sunglint as seen during the STS-96 mission from the Space Shuttle Discovery.

    Image # : STS096-705-066 

    (via iliveinaspiralgalaxy)

    — 2 weeks ago with 140 notes
    radiologysigns:

Barium enema in a neonate failing to pass meconium. What abnormal features are seen? Diagnosis?
ANSWER: http://goo.gl/6K1ZhQ

    radiologysigns:

    Barium enema in a neonate failing to pass meconium. What abnormal features are seen? Diagnosis?

    ANSWER: http://goo.gl/6K1ZhQ

    (via anaestheticroom)

    — 2 weeks ago with 52 notes
    usmleaid:

Faggot cell is a term used for cells normally found in the Hypergranular form of Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (FAB - M3). This term is applied to these Promyelocytes (not blast cells) because of the presence of numerous Auer rods in the cytoplasm.Promyelocytes in Hypergranular form of Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia with abundant Auer Rods in cytoplasm.

    usmleaid:

    Faggot cell is a term used for cells normally found in the Hypergranular form of Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (FAB - M3). 

    This term is applied to these Promyelocytes (not blast cells) because of the presence of numerous Auer rods in the cytoplasm.Promyelocytes in Hypergranular form of Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia with abundant Auer Rods in cytoplasm.

    (via medicineisnotmerchandise)

    — 2 weeks ago with 32 notes
    thenewenlightenmentage:

Cosmic inflation: BICEP2 and Planck to share data
Scientists on rival projects looking for evidence that the early Universe underwent a super-expansion are in discussion about working together.
The negotiations between the US-led BICEP2 group and Europe’s Planck Collaboration are at an early stage.
BICEP2 announced in March that its South Pole telescope had found good evidence for “cosmic inflation”.
Continue Reading

    thenewenlightenmentage:

    Cosmic inflation: BICEP2 and Planck to share data

    Scientists on rival projects looking for evidence that the early Universe underwent a super-expansion are in discussion about working together.

    The negotiations between the US-led BICEP2 group and Europe’s Planck Collaboration are at an early stage.

    BICEP2 announced in March that its South Pole telescope had found good evidence for “cosmic inflation”.

    Continue Reading

    — 2 weeks ago with 30 notes
    currentsinbiology:

Plasmepsin V, a Secret Weapon Against Malaria 

Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax are single-celled parasites that, between them, are responsible for the vast majority of malaria cases in humans. Of the two, P. falciparum often provokes the most acute symptoms, whereas P. vivax is associated with a recurring, chronic version of malarial disease. Both parasites spend a large portion of their life cycle living and replicating within human red blood cells (erythrocytes).
While inside erythrocytes, the parasites express and secrete more than 450 proteins. Each of these proteins has a different function for the parasite, but many of them share a distinctive feature: an amino-terminal motif called the Plasmodium EXport ELement (PEXEL). This special sequence of amino acids directs proteins into the export pathway, but it is partially removed while the protein is still within the parasite’s endoplasmic reticulum by an enzyme called Plasmepsin V (PMV). On the basis of this prominent function, it seems likely that PMV is important for parasite survival and may therefore be a good target for antimalarial drugs.

Citation: Sedwick C (2014) Plasmepsin V, a Secret Weapon Against Malaria. PLoS Biol 12(7): e1001898. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.1001898
Figure 1. Malaria parasites survive inside red blood cells by exporting proteins that renovate the cell. Inhibition of the export process, by blocking the malarial enzyme, Plasmepsin V, prevents red cell remodeling and kills the parasite.

Image credit: Justin Boddey. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.1001898.g001

    currentsinbiology:

    Plasmepsin V, a Secret Weapon Against Malaria

    Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax are single-celled parasites that, between them, are responsible for the vast majority of malaria cases in humans. Of the two, P. falciparum often provokes the most acute symptoms, whereas P. vivax is associated with a recurring, chronic version of malarial disease. Both parasites spend a large portion of their life cycle living and replicating within human red blood cells (erythrocytes).

    While inside erythrocytes, the parasites express and secrete more than 450 proteins. Each of these proteins has a different function for the parasite, but many of them share a distinctive feature: an amino-terminal motif called the Plasmodium EXport ELement (PEXEL). This special sequence of amino acids directs proteins into the export pathway, but it is partially removed while the protein is still within the parasite’s endoplasmic reticulum by an enzyme called Plasmepsin V (PMV). On the basis of this prominent function, it seems likely that PMV is important for parasite survival and may therefore be a good target for antimalarial drugs.

    Citation: Sedwick C (2014) Plasmepsin V, a Secret Weapon Against Malaria. PLoS Biol 12(7): e1001898. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.1001898

    Figure 1. Malaria parasites survive inside red blood cells by exporting proteins that renovate the cell. Inhibition of the export process, by blocking the malarial enzyme, Plasmepsin V, prevents red cell remodeling and kills the parasite.

    Image credit: Justin Boddey. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.1001898.g001

    (via thisfuturemd)

    — 2 weeks ago with 96 notes
    thenewenlightenmentage:

Milky Way at Eleven Mile Reservoir
Image Credit: Lars Leber

    thenewenlightenmentage:

    Milky Way at Eleven Mile Reservoir

    Image Credit: Lars Leber

    (Source: facebook.com)

    — 3 weeks ago with 152 notes
    humanoidhistory:

Apollo 8 launches on December 21, 1968.

    humanoidhistory:

    Apollo 8 launches on December 21, 1968.

    (via sci-universe)

    — 3 weeks ago with 446 notes
    scienceyoucanlove:

This is what a human heart looks from the inside! It is a complex and truly ingenious biological machine with its own engine (cardiac muscle cells), cables (sinoatrial node, atrioventricular node etc.), valves (heart valves) and pipes (aorta, pulmonary veins) Image byUniversity of Washington
text source 

    scienceyoucanlove:

    This is what a human heart looks from the inside! It is a complex and truly ingenious biological machine with its own engine (cardiac muscle cells), cables (sinoatrial node, atrioventricular node etc.), valves (heart valves) and pipes (aorta, pulmonary veins) 

    Image by
    University of Washington

    text source 

    — 3 weeks ago with 518 notes